Everyday 9000 Americans Become Unexpected and Unprepared Caregivers

GoogleMost all of us are or will be caregivers sometime during our lives. If you assist an injured friend buying medicine, deliver food to an elder from your church, or visit elderly family members – you are a caregiver.

Care giving will become a common household term in future years. Currently 6000 Americans celebrate their 65th birthday, 3800 will become 85, and 10,000 turn 50 years old – daily. There are 35 million senior citizens in America now and by the year 2030 that figure will double to over 70,000,000. (Wolf, 2002). By the time you finish reading this article 4 people will have become caregivers.

These staggering figures above indicate the need for all Americans to become familiar with elder care and take advantage of this trend by entering this field. Do not expect our government to be prepared for this transition. Although they are making changes this wave is so massive and affects so many different areas of our society, that we will not be ready. The only way to make certain our thoroughbred Americans (That includes you) receive the care they deserve, will be for our citizens to take an active role. The family caregiver is and will continue to be the cornerstone of our elder care services.

Thoroughbred Americans inhabit coffee shops across our great nation. Some may not have contributed anything significant to our country, but they helped build it, and are entitled to the best care available – and that requires thoughtful planning ahead.

About 9000 Americans become unexpected and unprepared caregivers daily. Most Americans are not educated or knowledgeable about how to care for their elderly parents. Many people are suddenly thrown into the position as a caregiver without warning due to an illness, injury, or surgery. If we prepare and become more educated about this subject it will enable us to be better caregivers and to make this responsibility much easier.

As the large Baby Boomer population ages almost 25% of our nation will be senior citizens. Currently there are about 35 million senior citizens in the United States with that number to double to about 70 million by the year 2030.[1] (Wolf, 2002). According to, Aging in the 21st Century compiled by the United States Administration on Aging, “the population aged 65 and over is expected to grow by 75 percent to over 69 million.”[2]

These staggering figures above indicate the need for all Americans to become familiar with elder care or take advantage of this trend by entering this field. Do not expect our government to be prepared for this transition. Although they are making changes this wave is so massive and affects so many different areas of our society, that we will not be ready. The only way to make certain our thoroughbred Americans, (that includes you) receive the care they deserve, will be for our citizens to take an active role. The family caregiver is and will continue to be the cornerstone of our elder care services.

According to the, “MetLife Caregiving Cost Study: Productivity Losses to U.S. Business (2006),” “The total estimated cost to employers for all full-time, employed caregivers is $33.6 billion.”[3] Those costs are expected to rise as the senior demographics grow. It affects your finances by lost wages, and fewer contributions to your retirement, and Social Security. The book “Care Giving Made Easy – How to be an Awesome Caregiver,” is designed to help battle some of these growing problems using preventative techniques to ensure the health and safety of our veterans and thoroughbred Americans.

Dale B. Adams formed Majestic Publishers in 2000, and is the author and self publisher of the new book, “Care Giving Made Easy – How to be an Awesome Caregiver” Second Edition and the soon to be released, “How to Make Your Home Sell – Even In A Slow Market” His many experiences include being a Security Consultant, General Contractor and Energy Conservation Specialist. To learn more valuable information visit:http://www.majesticpublishers.com

 

[1]   Wolf, A. (2002, July/August). Health-care safety: Assisted-living. “NFPA Journal,” 26. 39-42 Retrieved from           http://www.usfa.fema.gov/pdf/efop/efo36821.pdf

[2]    Siegel, Jacob, (1996), “Aging in the 21st Century” Retrieved from             http://www.aoa.gov/AoARoot/Aging_Statistics/future_growth/aging21/aging_21.aspx

[3]    Wagner, Lottes & Neal, (2006), MetLife Caregiving Cost Study: Productivity Losses to U.S. Business           http://www.caregiving.org/data/Caregiver%20Cost%20Study.pdf